Speakers

Speakers’ bios and abstracts below appear in order of their presentation according to the agenda.

Underneath student names is a link to a very short survey to review their presentation. We strongly encourage Industrial Affiliates members to complete these short surveys to both 1) give feedback to the student and 2) so that students may be considered for the awards. Please also find under each person’s name a link to a printable pdf of each person’s profile.

Workshop Presenters
Five-Minute Rapid Fire Presenters
Lab Tours
Poster Presenters

Keynote Speaker

James E. Millerd and Neal J. Brock, 4D Technology

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 9:17 AM – 9:57 AM

Title: “The Innovation Metrology Behind the James Webb Space Telescope”

Abstract: NASA’s revolutionary James Webb Space Telescope was recently launched and is currently being deployed in a zero-gravity location well past the moon where servicing is impossible. Producing its sophisticated optical system required new technology and methods to ensure its components would perform as designed and presented a significant metrology challenge. This talk will present an overview of the telescope and the innovative dynamic interferometry techniques that were developed and used during fabrication, assembly and final test. The optical metrology instruments, originally developed for JWST, are now being used to meet the most challenging metrology requirements in semiconductor, data storage, AR/VR, automotive, aerospace, defense, and other high technology manufacturing industries throughout the world.

Bio: Dr. James Millerd and Mr. Neal Brock are co-founders of 4D Vision Technology, Inc. and 4D Technology Corporation where they served as President and Director of Technology Development, respectively, until 4D was acquired in 2018 by Nanometrics (now Onto Innovation). Their work in real-time holography and optical measurement has led to over 80 publications, 15 patents, and multiple product awards in the areas of vibration-insensitive interferometry. Previously, Dr. Millerd held positions at MetroLaser and Northup-Grumman (TRW) and has a BS in Physics and EE from CSU, Chico (1987) and Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (1992). Mr. Brock held positions at MetroLaser, Aerometrics, NASA, Navy, and Marine Corps, and has a BS in Physics from San Jose State University (1990).

Workshop Presenters

Khanh Kieu,
Associate Professor of Optical Sciences

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 9:58 a.m.

Title: “Advances in Fiber Laser Based Multiphoton Microscopy”

Abstract: Ultrafast lasers which generate femtosecond or picosecond pulses are important tools in modern scientific research and technological applications. These lasers have been notorious for their high cost, bulkiness, and complexity in day-to-day operation. We have been improving these laser systems using optical fiber technology. It is now possible to build very compact, low cost, and reliable ultrafast fiber lasers working in a wide range of wavelengths. I will review the latest ultrafast fiber laser systems that we have developed for multiphoton microscopy.

Bio: Dr. Khanh Kieu is an associate professor at the Wyant College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona. He went to college in Saint Petersburg, Russia. He received a PhD degree from the College of Optical Sciences (UA) in 2007. Dr. Kieu then did a postdoctoral study at Cornell University for a couple of years before returning to UA as a faculty member. His main research interests are in laser physics, nonlinear optics, multiphoton microscopy, and precision measurements.

Remington Spencer Ketchum, Ph.D. Student

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Wyant College of Optical Sciences
Advisor: Robert Norwood and Pierre-Alexandre Blanche

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 10:19 a.m.

Title: “Texas Instruments PLM for Holography”

Abstract: A discussion of characterization of new MEMS piston based phase-only spatial light modulator (PLM) technology for the projection of holographic images. Optimization of computer generated holograms (CGH) will also be discussed.

Bio: Spencer Ketchum is a Ph.D. student at the Wyant College of Optical Sciences. Spencer’s work at OSC has primarily focused on solar energy systems, diffractive optics, and holography.

Minghao Hu, Ph.D. Student

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Wyant College of Optical Sciences
Advisor: David Brady

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 10:32 a.m.

Title: “Array Cameras for Sports Analytics”

Abstract: Sports analytics with computer vision tools requires high spatial and temporal resolution sampling within a large area, especially in our example case, baseball. That task throws a challenge to modern camera systems, as well as image/video analyzing algorithms. In this presentation, I will introduce the array camera design we proposed to fulfill the capturing task, and the machine learning approaches we’re using to process array camera data. 

Bio: Minghao Hu is a Ph.D. candidate of Duke University, now working on array camera design and array camera data processing in Prof. Brady’s group at the University of Arizona. He believes that with analyzed design and the help of machine learning vision tools, we can build powerful, compact, and affordable array cameras. His work on array camera snapshot ptychography has appeared in Optical Express.

Miroslav Kolesik, 
Professor of Optical Sciences

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 10:56 a.m.

Title: “Nonlinearity and Turbulence in Long-wavelength Infra-red Pulses: Competition or Synergy?”

Abstract: We study the interplay between the optical turbulence and nonlinearity in long-wavelength infrared pulsed beams. Contrary to the intuition, we find that in certain regimes turbulence acts in synergy with the self-focusing nonlinearity, and aids in the nonlinear self-trapping of the beam.

Bio: M. Kolesik is a professor at the Wyant College of Optical Sciences. His research interests are in the area of computational nonlinear optics.

Kevin Kuper, Ph.D. Student

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Wyant College of Optical Sciences
Advisor: Poul Jessen

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 11:17 a.m.

Title: “Disentangling Sources of Error on a Quantum Simulator”

Abstract: Noisy, intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) processors are improving rapidly but remain well short of requirements for fault tolerant computation. In the meantime, much effort has focused on the development of quantum simulators that operate without error correction. So-called “digital” processors can simulate non-native Hamiltonians through Trotterization, wherein the evolution is broken into discrete steps using a Trotter-Suzuki expansion. When simulating the evolution over a total time T, this introduces Trotter errors that scale inversely with the number of time steps. For optimal performance, this must be weighed against the native errors inherent to the processor hardware implementation, which scale roughly in proportion with the number of time steps. Notably, the optimal step size can be affected by the appearance of chaos in the Trotterized dynamics, which leads to hypersensitivity to both Trotter and native errors. We investigate each of these error regimes in quantum simulations running on a small, highly-accurate quantum processor based on the combined electron-nuclear spins of a Cs-133 atom. As a concrete example, we focus on the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick Hamiltonian, which when Trotterized becomes the Quantum-Kicked-Top – a well-studied system that exhibits chaos and dynamical instability. Finally, we show that OTOC measurements can be implemented and used to identify the presence of chaos and instabilities as they appear and disappear with changing Trotter step size.

Bio: Kevin is a Ph.D. student at the Wyant College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. He works with Professor Poul Jessen and other researchers in the Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC). He is currently studying quantum control, particularly how Trotterization can lead to the onset of chaos. He examines ways of detecting errors and chaos by using a cold-atom quantum simulator based on the nuclear and electron spins of Cesium-133 atoms. Through his research, he has become acquainted with the fundamentals of quantum information, quantum computing, and quantum optics. He has acquired skills in coding (primarily using MATLAB, though he has experience with other languages), processing large sets of data, and running a 16-dimensional quantum simulator (equivalent to 4-quantum bits). He is approaching the end of his degree and is looking for jobs, especially in the field of quantum information/computation. Before pursuing his Ph.D., he graduated Summa Cum Laude with a B.S. in Physics at California State University in Fullerton (CSUF). There, he did research with Professor Geoffrey Lovelace using supercomputers to simulate gravitational waves emanating from binary black hole collisions.

Cheng Li, Ph.D. Student

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Wyant College of Optical Sciences
Advisor: Tsu-Te Judith Su

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 11:30 a.m.

Title: “High Sensitivity and Selectivity Whispering Gallery Mode Chemical Gas Sensor”

Abstract: Over the past few decades, a growing number of toxic and hazardous chemicals have appeared in the form of gases in industry, on the battlefield, in laboratories, or in other scenarios. We use a high sensitivity and selectivity system known as FLOWER (frequency locked optical whispering evanescent resonator) to rapidly detect trace amounts of three different vapors using polymer-based microtoroid.

Bio: Cheng Li is a Ph.D. candidate in Dr. Judith Su’s lab. His research focuses on ultra-sensitive and selective optical whispering gallery mode microcavities and their biochemical applications. He is currently investigating the use of frequency locked optical whispering evanescent resonator (FLOWER) system for low concentration gas detection. In addition, his research also includes improvements and enhancements to the FLOWER.

Daewook Kim,
Associate Professor of Optical Sciences

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 1:30 p.m.

Title: “OASIS: Inflatable Space Telescope Technology”

Abstract: A disruptive space telescope concept, the 20-meter OASIS (Orbiting Astronomical Satellite for Investigating Stellar Systems), is being designed and developed at the University of Arizona. OASIS combines break-through inflatable aperture and metrology techniques to realize the dream of a 10 – 20 meter class spaceborne terahertz/far-infrared telescope. The OASIS concept has the potential to greatly reduce mission costs and risks compared to the current state of the art.

Bio: Daewook Kim is an associate professor of optical sciences and astronomy at the University of Arizona. He has been working in the optical engineering field for more than 15 years, including NASA Aspera UV space telescope mission, 25 m diameter Giant Magellan Telescope, and commercial Augmented Reality freeform glass project. His main research area covers precision freeform optics design, fabrication, and various metrology topics, such as interferometric test systems using computer-generated hologram, wavefront curvature measurement, and dynamic deflectometry system. For the past 10 years, Daewook has been chairing conference programs including the Optical Manufacturing and Testing conference (SPIE), Optical Fabrication and Testing conference (OSA), and the Astronomical Optics: Design, Manufacture, and Test of Space and Ground Systems conference (SPIE). He is also teaching the SPIE Optical Testing Short Courses. He has published more than 170 journal/conference papers and served as an associate editor for the Optics Express journal for 7 years. He gave more than 20 plenary, keynote, colloquium talks at various international conferences and universities. Prof. Kim is an SPIE Fellow.

Lindsey Wiley, Ph.D. Student

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Wyant College of Optical Sciences
Advisor: Ronald Driggers & David Brady

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 1:51 p.m.

Title: “Target Discrimination in the Extended SWIR Band”

Abstract: Long range target identification is well studied in the Visible (Vis) and Near Infrared (NIR) bands, and more recently in the Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR). The longer wavelength of SWIR (1.1-1.7um) improves target detection for both long ranges and under challenging atmospheric conditions because it is less limited by scattering and absorption in the atmosphere. For these reasons, SWIR sensors are proliferating on military platforms. The extended short wave infrared (eSWIR) band spanning from 2 to 2.5um is not limited by diffraction, and, as a result, the band benefits target acquisition both at long ranges and for degraded visual environments. Theoretical and experimental data compare eSWIR to Vis, NIR, and SWIR for atmospheric transmission, reflectivity, illumination, and sensor resolution and sensitivity. Both the theory and experiment demonstrate advantages of using eSWIR for long range target identification.

Bio: Lindsey Wiley is in her 2nd year of the Ph.D. program working in the Infrared Systems Group under Dr. Ron Driggers and co-advisor Dr. David Brady. She graduated from Colgate University in 2020 with a Bachelor’s degree in Physics, where she performed quantum optics research while also playing Division 1 soccer. Her research interests include infrared imaging for long range target identification and studies of the extended shortwave infrared band.

Tyler Peterson, Ph.D. Student

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Wyant College of Optical Sciences
Advisor: Rongguang Liang

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 2:04 p.m.

Title: “Monolithic Freeform Prism for Handheld Multiphoton Probe”

Abstract: Multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy provides deep mucosal imaging at subcellular resolution, making it highly promising as an optical biopsy method for oral cancer detection and diagnosis. A small device form factor is required to comfortably navigate the oral cavity, but this conflicts with the need for a large numerical aperture (NA) to efficiently excite endogenous fluorophores. To mitigate this tradeoff, we present the design of a monolithic freeform prism objective with a NA of 0.50 and field of view of 800μm. The prism will be manufactured in-house using single point diamond turning. We also present a design concept for an auxiliary prism that leverages multiple surfaces of the objective prism to enable large area scanning, extending the clinical usefulness of the proposed handheld probe.

Bio: Tyler Peterson is a second-year Ph.D. student in Dr. Rongguang Liang’s lab at the University of Arizona, where he works on the design of clinical imaging devices for early cancer detection. He is currently investigating design strategies for freeform optics with an eye for manufacturability, as well as novel microscopy systems that leverage emerging illumination technologies. Prior to joining UA, Tyler received his M.S. in Applied Physics from the University of Oregon and worked in industry as an optical engineer for five years designing and testing fluorescence microscopes. In his free time, he enjoys playing jazz piano, hiking, drawing, and reading.

Amit Ashok, 
Associate Professor of Optical Sciences

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 2:17 p.m.

Title: “Quantum-inspired Optical Super-resolution Imaging”

Abstract: Traditionally, the resolving power of passive optical imaging systems is understood to be determined by the Rayleigh resolution limit. However, a rigorous analysis of the two-point resolution problem, using Quantum information theory, has demonstrated that the Rayleigh limit is not fundamental. In this talk, I will discuss our work on pursuing a broader understanding and analysis of the quantum limits of passive optical imaging in the sub-Rayleigh domain (i.e., optical super-resolution) for complex scenes (such as point source constellations, continuous line sources etc.).

Bio: Dr. Amit Ashok is an Associate Professor in the College of Optical Sciences and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona. His research interests include computational/compressive imaging and sensing, Bayesian inference, statistical optics, and information theory and its applications to imaging modalities spanning RF to EO/IR and X-ray domains.

Jingwei Zhao, Ph.D. Student

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Wyant College of Optical Sciences
Advisor: Dongkyun Kang

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 2:38 p.m.

Title: “Scattering-based Light Sheet Microscopy for Imaging Unstained Tissue”

Abstract: Scattering-based light sheet microscopy (sLSM) is a new microscopy technique that can image unstained tissue with high resolution and large field of view. sLSM is a potential tool to facilitate detection of early-stage anal malignancy and increase the biopsy yield to avoid unnecessary biopsy of benign lesions. However, the optimal wavelength for sLSM needs to be investigated that provides a sufficient cellular contrast in the epithelium while achieving an acceptable imaging depth. We recently developed a bench sLSM setup to investigate the optimal wavelength for tissue sLSM imaging.

Bio: Jingwei Zhao is a Ph.D. student working in the Translational Optical Imaging lab under supervision of professor Dongkyun Kang. She previously worked on deep learning-based denoising for portable confocal microscopy and developing cross-polarized microscopy for skin imaging. Her current research is to develop scattering-based light sheet microscopy for anal cancer diagnosis.

Dustin Tran, Ph.D. Student

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Wyant College of Optical Sciences
Advisor: Leilei Peng

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 2:51 p.m.

Title: “Fluorescence Anisotropy Imaging Using a Low-cost, Polarization-sensitive CMOS Camera”

Abstract: Fluorescence anisotropy imaging is a commonly used technique to study biomolecular dynamics. It utilizes the polarization properties of fluorescence emissions that occur from changes in structure and orientation of fluorophores caused by angular displacement of the biomolecules. This can be an important tool to observe the dynamics of protein binding and organization for live cell studies. However, traditional fluorescence anisotropy imaging systems require the use of either multiple detectors or exposures to measure the extent of polarization in the emitted light. We present the capability of using a polarization-sensitive camera as a low-cost method of performing single-exposure fluorescence anisotropy imaging. Our setup utilizes a 5.0 MP polarization-sensitive monochrome CMOS sensor with an integrated wire grid polarizer array capable of performing simultaneous measurements of different polarization channels using a single detector. When combined with a scanning light sheet microscope, the method can achieve high speed, 3D observations of cellular dynamics at sub-micro resolution, which enables functional light sheet imaging of key biological activities, such as actin cytoskeleton dynamics during cell migration.

Bio: Dustin Tran is a Ph.D. Candidate in Dr. Leilei Peng’s lab from the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

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Five-Minute Rapid Fire Presenters

Ted Lee, Ph.D. Student

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 3:25 p.m.
Title: “Wavelength multiplexed field of view expansion for high-resolution near-to-eye displays”
Advisor: Yuzuru Takashima

Pengyinjie Lyu, Ph.D. Student

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 3:30 p.m.
Title: “Perceptual-driven Approach to Statically Foveated Head-Mounted Displays”
Advisor: Hong Hua

Kevin Derby, M.S. Student

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 3:35 p.m.
Title: “Curved primary aperture segmentation to enable a robust quasi-Airy point spread function”
Advisor: Daewook Kim

Jenna Montague, Ph.D. Student

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 3:40 p.m.
Title: “Quantitative Second Harmonic Measurements for Colon Cancer”
Advisor: Jennifer Barton

Matthew Spotnitz, Ph.D. Student

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 3:45 p.m.
Title: “Terahertz Spectroscopy Of Semiconductor Microcavity Lasers”
Advisor: Rolf Binder

Khalid Omer, Ph.D. Student

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 3:50 p.m.
Title: “Compression, Interpolation, and Importance Sampling for Polarized BRDF Models”
Advisor: Meredith Kupinski

Chengyu Wang, Ph.D. Student

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 3:55 p.m.
Title: “Snapshot Ptychography on Array Cameras”
Advisor: David Brady

Ryan Rhoades, Ph.D. Student

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022 | 4:00 p.m.
Title: “Dual-comb molecular absorption spectroscopy a laser-produced plasma”
Advisor: Jason Jones

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Lab Tours

Wednesday, February 16, 2022 

Ted Lee, Parker Liu, Xianyue Deng

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Advisor: Yuzuru Takashima
Meinel 663
Takashima Lab: Advanced Lidar and Display 

Jeff Chan, M.S. Student

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Advisor: Yuzuru Takashima
Meinel 663
Takashima Group

Charles Revello, M.S. Student

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Advisor: Ronald Driggers
Meinel 106F
Infrared Systems Group

Kevin Kuper, Ph.D. Student

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Advisor: Poul Jessen
Meinel 568
Quantum Control and Simulation with Cesium Atoms

Ryan Rhoades, Ph.D. Student

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Advisor:  Jason Jones
Meinel 656
NIR Dual-comb molecular Spectroscopy Lab 

Spencer Ketchum, Ph.D. Student

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Advisor: Pierre-Alexandre Blanche
Meinel 223
Holographic Waveguides

Itay Ozer, M.S. Student and Michael Grace, Ph.D Student

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Advisor: Saikat Guha
Meinel 565
Photonic Applications

Alex Wendt, Ph.D. Student

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Advisor: Saikat Guha
Meinel 453
Quantum Photonic Applications

Chengyu Wang, Ph.D. Student

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Advisor:  David Brady
Meinel 106G
Snapshot Ptychography on Array Cameras

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Poster Presenters

Please use the link attached to the students’ names to evaluate their presentations.

Student Presenter Academic Level Advisor Specialty Presentation Title
Kevin Figueroa PhD David J. Brady & Hong Hua Image Science Hybrid-Optoelectronic Light Field Pass-Through, A Compressive Display/ Array Camera Imaging Device & System
Eric Reichel PhD Russell Witte Image Science Real-Time Trimodal Ultrasound, Photoacoustic, and Thermoacoustic Imaging for Biomedical Applications
Joshua Follansbee PhD Ronald Driggers Optical Engineering Drone Detection in the Reflective Bands: VIS, NIR, SWIR, and eSWIR
Jeff Chan MS Yuzuru Takashima Optical Engineering DMD-based diffractive FOV steering for real-time lidar by 2D Multi-pixel detector array
Chin-I Tang MS Yuzuru Takashima Optical Engineering Real-time beam tracking by Texas Instruments Phase Light Modulator  
Parker Liu PhD Yuzuru Takashima Optical Engineering Volume Holographic for Wavelength Multiplexed Field of View Expansion 
Charles Revello MS Ronald Driggers Optical Engineering GPS Denied, Vision-Based Navigation
Eunmo Kang MS Yuzuru Takashima Optical Engineering Large Etendue solid-state-lidar with MEMS-resonant mirror assisted diffractive beam steering by Digital Micro Mirror devices
Zhipeng Dong MS Yuzuru Takashima Optical Engineering Infrared Light Modulation with MEMS PLM for Lidar Application
Xianyue Deng PhD Yuzuru Takashima Optical Engineering Diffraction efficiency of Texas Instruments Phase Light Modulator for quasi continuous laser beam steering
Ted Lee PhD Yuzuru Takashima Optical Engineering Wavelength multiplexed field of view expansion for high-resolution near-to-eye displays
Patrick Leslie MS Ronald Driggers Optical Engineering Empirical Model for Simulating LWIR and MWIR Radiometric and Spatial Characteristics of Clouds
Kevin Laverty PhD Brandon Chalifoux Optical Engineering Ultrafast Laser Stress Figuring of Fused Silica Mirrors
Kevin Kuper PhD Poul Jessen Optical Physics Disentangling sources of error on a quantum simulator
Matthew Spotnitz PhD Rolf Binder Optical Physics Terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor microcavity lasers
Mitul Dey Chowdhury, Aman Agrawal PhD Dalziel Wilson Optical Physics Membrane-based Optomechanical Accelerometry
Christian Pluchar (PhD), Charles Condos (PhD), Utkal Pandurangi (MS) Multiple Dalziel Wilson Optical Physics Nanoscale torsional dissipation dilution for quantum experiments and precision measurement
Ian Tillman PhD Saikat Guha Photonics Continuous-Variable Quantum Repeater Networks Based on Noiseless Linear Amplification and Mode Multiplexing

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